Tag: grammar

Two, to or too: which one to use?

Homophones (words that sound the same but have different meanings) can cause confusion. It’s easy to write hear instead of here, there instead of their, or to instead of too. Anything can happen when you’re quickly writing. That’s why editing

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When to use past and passed

They say the past is a foreign country. Sometimes, knowing whether to use past or passed can make English seem like a foreign language. Despite sounding the same, past and passed (and, if you want to be fancy, parsed) are

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The days of yore, you’re and your

Apart from maybe its/it’s, the most common error I come across today is the incorrect use of your and you’re. (Yore doesn’t get much of a look in but isn’t it a great word?) Facebook comments and posts, tweets, YouTube

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Unwanted: the grocers’ apostrophe

You see it everywhere: the grocers’ apostrophe. It got its moniker from grocers who would advertise “banana’s”, “apple’s” and “potato’s” for sale in their shops. Of course, it’s not only limited to items of fresh produce (and my apologies to

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Who’s got whose grammar?

The English language is a funny thing when it comes to possessions. Sometimes it’s easy to see who owns something, sometimes it’s not, and other times it’s just too confusing. One of the stranger examples is who’s versus whose. For

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Easter with a capital e

Just because it’s Easter and we’re busy stuffing ourselves with chocolate and hot cross buns doesn’t mean it’s time for slack capitalisation, particularly when it comes to holidays. Easter, Good Friday, Easter Sunday, Shrove Tuesday, Pentecost, Christmas, All Soul’s Day,

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An everyday problem or a problem every day?

No, everyday and every day aren’t the same thing. Everyday means ordinary, of the norm, or relating to something that happens daily. For example, it’s an everyday thing or I’m wearing my everyday clothes. Overall, it’s something that’s fairly commonplace.

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You find the strangest things down alleys…

I know I’m part of a dying breed, one of those obsessive types who struggles to look past a spelling mistake or grammatical error. It really is a problem. There’s probably a syndrome for it. I recently walked past a

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